Upcoming Performances

Target Theatre's newest play:
Target Theatre Radio Hour
By Susan Wilkey and Judith McDowell.
Concerns related to staying safe are humorously brought to life by The Target Gang in this 40's style radio show with songs, music, a soap opera, the comedy of Dot and Dotty and, of course, the melodies of the Target Singers.

Wot, No Soap?

Wot, No Soap? at the Fringe…

“A fascinating and powerful waltz through the personal histories of eight people acting out their lives and recollections during World War II. Target Theatre’s gold-medal-winning seniors are rich storytellers who charm and engage the audience with hilarious, witty and honest monologues strung together by music, dance and memory. Bring your tissue and get ready to laugh, cry and laugh some more.”

“By the time I walked out of the theatre, there wasn’t an actor I didn’t want to bundle up, take home with me, make a big pot of tea and dig out my best cookies for, and sit down with… wide-eyed and hopeful for more stories.”

“It’ll make you laugh. It’ll get your toes a-tappin’. It will, no matter how hard you try to avoid it, bring a lump to your throat. Then it’ll make you laugh all over again. Through a series of short vignettes and monologues, on a simple stage set against a musical backdrop of “In the Mood” and “Roll Out the Barrel,” the players of Victoria’s Target Theatre recall the sometimes light-hearted, sometimes heart-wrenching realities of coming of age in World War II. There’s the terror of being young and alone in a bomb shelter in London, the disappointment of lining up at the butcher’s shop to buy bacon only to discover that there’s nothing left except tripe, and (on the other side of the ration card, as it were) the pride of being a female machinist helping to build a Rolls Royce tank engine. And there are the timeless challenges of teenagehood: unravelling the mysteries of the opposite sex, sitting alone at the local dance, and dispelling the myth of kissing (no dear, it won’t make you pregnant). For those in the audience on opening night who went through the war during their teens, the play undoubtedly brought back memories. For those of us a touch younger, it was a pleasant blend of entertainment and social history…”

“WW II as told by those who were kids and teenagers at the time. No pretensions, just very well done.